WEF Ideas Lab: Building Resilience Against Systemic Risks

In his Ideas Lab session at the World Economic Forum’s 2014 Annual Meeting of the New Champions in Tianjin, Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, speaks about building resilience against systemic risks, an issue explored in depth in his latest book, The Butterfly Defect.

How competitiveness is undermined by restrictions on migration

Why do we need a global agreement for climate change?

What will our world look like in 10 years time?

Professor Ian Goldin interviewed at Les Rencontres économiques d’Aix-en-Provence

Professor Ian Goldin interviewed at Les Rencontres économiques d’Aix-en-Provence 2014 on the limits of globalisation and global economic governance.

World Bank Open Learning Campus: Professor Ian Goldin discusses global risks

As part of the World Bank’s Open Learning Campus, focusing on the World Development Report 2014, Professor Ian Goldin gives insights into managing global risks.

Professor Ian Goldin on ‘Is the Planet Full?’

What are the impacts of population growth? Can our planet support the demands of the ten billion people anticipated to be the world’s population by the middle of this century? Here Professor Ian Goldin gives an overview of ‘Is the Planet Full?’, a collection of essays from Oxford Martin School academics, tackling one of the most important issues of our time.

Professor Ian Goldin on ‘The Butterfly Defect’

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, gives an overview of his new book, ‘The Butterfly Defect: How globalization creates systemic risks, and what to do about it’.

The Princeton Lecture: The Butterfly Defect

Globalisation has brought us vast benefits including growth in incomes, education, innovation and connectivity. Professor Ian Goldin, director of the Oxford Martin School, argues that it also has the potential to destabilise our societies.

In his forthcoming book, ‘The Butterfly Defect: How globalisation creates systemic risks, and what to do about it’, co-authored with Mike Mariathasan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of Vienna, he describes how these risks spread across supply chains, pandemics, infrastructure, ecology, climate change, economics and politics. Unless these risks are addressed, says Goldin, they could lead to greater protectionism, xenophobia, nationalism and to deglobalisation, rising conflict and slower growth.

Panel debate: Is the Planet Full?

What are the impacts of population growth? Can our planet support the demands of the ten billion people anticipated to be the world’s population by the middle of this century? A panel of Oxford Martin School academics debate the themes in the soon-to-be-released collection of essays, Is the Planet Full?