On The Pursuit of Development

Ian Goldin at Google Zeitgeist Global 2016

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, speaks at Google Zeitgeist Global 2016.

Age of discovery: navigating the risks and rewards of our new renaissance

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, and fellow author Chris Kutarna preview their forthcoming book about the risks and rewards of a new Renaissance taking place in our modern world. They show how we can achieve our own golden age, given the will. But many of the factors that undid the first Renaissance are rising once again: warring ideologies, fundamentalism, climate change, pandemics. Can we weather the crises and seize the moment to leave the world a legacy it will still celebrate, 500 years later?

The pursuit of development, economic growth, social change and ideas

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, looks at what we mean by development and what citizens, governments and the international community can do to encourage it.

Goldin explains how the notion of development has expanded from the original focus on incomes and economic growth to a much broader interpretation. He considers the contributions made by education, health, gender and equity, and argues that it is also necessary take into account the rule of law, the role of institutions, and sustainability and environmental concerns.

The genius and risks of our new renaissance

Professor Ian Goldin speaks at OEB 2015

Rethinking Global Governance | Ian Goldin | World Economic Forum 2015

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, tackles the question of the global commons. In this video for the World Economic Forum, he asks “how can we come together, often against our short term interests, to manage collective, longer term challenges?”

 

Other videos from IdeasLab, Davos, 2015

Public lecture at the Systemic Risk Centre, LSE: The Butterfly Defect

On 3 February, 2015, Professor Ian Goldin spoke about his book, The Butterfly Defect, for an audience at the LSE, addressing how global hyperconnectivity creates systemic risks and how this can be managed effectively. The event also saw him in conversation with Professor Danny Quah, Professor of Economics and International Development at LSE, chaired by Jean-Pierre Zigrand, Associate Professor of Finance at LSE and Director of the Systemic Risk Centre

Investing for healthier societies

Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, delivers the keynote at the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) conference in New York. The conference brought ogether a distinguished line-up of government decision-makers and leading players in the field of global health to review how, in a time of resource constraints, ever-broader healthcare systems can sustainably meet the needs and expectations of patients and societies.

The butterfly defect: how globalization creates systemic risks, and what to do about it

Globalisation has brought us vast benefits including growth in incomes, education, innovation and connectivity.  Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, argues that it also has the potential to destabilise our societies. In The Butterfly Defect: How globalisation creates systemic risks, and what to do about it, he and co-author Mike Mariathasan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of Vienna, argue that the recent financial crisis is an example of the risks that the world will face in the coming decades.

The risks spread across supply chains, pandemics, infrastructure, ecology, climate change, economics and politics. Unless these risks are addressed, says Goldin, they could lead to greater protectionism, xenophobia, nationalism and to deglobalisation, rising conflict and slower growth.